Making sense out of a life sentence: the narrative of paroled lifers

Dashka Slater, Elizabeth Kita and Louis Hammonds, Sr, Moderator Lee Slome

Friday Apr. 12, 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

flyerOver the past ten years, some 3000 people serving life sentences in California prisons have been given parole. To gain their freedom, these inmates must offer a narrative of their lives that makes sense of the past and offers a plan for the future. This narrative – starting in childhood and digging deep into a life filled with trauma, trouble, and terrible deeds – is composed through an intensive period of self-discovery conducted within prison walls and then culminating in an hours-long interrogation before the parole board. Most lifers embark on the process because they want to get out of prison. But as they go about taking the steps for becoming parole eligible, they unwittingly find themselves engaged in a process that leads not only to reform, but to a level of self-awareness that people on the outside rarely achieve. Reporter Dashka Slater has covered California’s unusual parole process for The New York Times Magazine, focusing on the profound changes that the pursuit of parole has wrought on men and women who expected to die in prison. In conversation with social worker Dr. Beth Kita and peer reentry navigator for formerly incarcerated people, Louie Hammonds, this Second Friday program explores the lives and stories of those forgotten faces of the nation’s incarceration era.

When
April 12th, 2019 6:30 PM
Location
530 Bush Street
Suite 700
San Francisco, CA 94108
United States
Contact
Phone: 415-288-4050
Email:
Event Fee(s)
Admission
General Admission $ 20.00
Member Admission $ 10.00
Candidate or Student $ 0.00
CE Credits (2) $ 20.00